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Msgr. Funaro Believed In Possibility

A Mass of Christian Burial for Msgr. Joseph Funaro, retired pastor of Our Lady Queen of Martyrs parish, Forest Hills, was celebrated Aug. 17 at the church. He died Aug. 14 at New York Medical Hospital Queens after a prolonged illness. He was 76.

funaro josephBorn in Brooklyn, he attended New Utrecht H.S., Bensonhurst; St. Jerome’s College, Kitchener, Ontario, Canada; and St. Vincent’s Seminary, Latrobe, Pa.

He was ordained May 29, 1965 by Bishop Bryan J. McEntegart at St. James Pro-Cathedral, Downtown Brooklyn.

He served as an associate at Our Lady of Grace parish, Howard Beach, 1965-73, and then was assigned to Catholic Charities as the director of communications. As director of the Diocesan Theater Guild, he directed 25 musical productions that raised funds for Catholic Charities.

He was named a monsignor in 1988.

In 1989, he was named pastor of Assumption parish, Brooklyn Heights, where he served until 2000 when he became pastor at Our Lady Queen of Martyrs. He officially retired in 2012 but continued to serve as parish administrator for the new pastor, Auxiliary Bishop Paul Sanchez.

Before he was ordained a priest, Msgr. Funaro worked as a cartoonist for Paramount Pictures. He illustrated Casper the Friendly Ghost, Little Audrey, Popeye, Wimpy, Baby Huey, Catnip and Herman.

Bishop Sanchez was the main celebrant of the funeral Mass. Special concelebrants included Auxiliary Bishop Raymond Chappetto, Msgr. Edward Scharfenberger, Fathers Frank Passenant, George Cowan, Michael Carrano, Jan Czudek and Phillip Pizzo, who preached the homily.

“Above all else, Joe Funaro was a good priest,” Father Pizzo said. “He left behind a lucrative career to become a priest. He put his whole personality into it.

“Msgr. Funaro made everyone feel good about themselves because he knew he was a representative of Jesus Christ.

“He loved putting on plays.  Wherever we went someone would come up to him who was in this play or that play.

“He also was a consummate fund raiser for Catholic Charities and then he put this parish back on the map.”

Bishop Sanchez said that Msgr. Funaro was “a faithful priest who gave his all to the parishes he served and to Catholic Charities which he loved so much.”

Deacon Greg Kandra, who preached at the Vigil Mass, said, “Above all else, Joe Funaro was a man of faith. Tremendous, towering faith.

“We heard him express that faith again and again from this altar in five words that could have been his creed – ‘­­Nothing is impossible with God.’

“Joe Funaro proved that himself again and again. He was a man who believed in possibility.

Burial was in Holy Rood Cemetery, Westbury, L.I.

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New Principals of Catholic Schools/Academies

pincipals

In the back row, from left, are: Danielle Walden; Brother Larry Lavallee, F.M.S.; Mary Bellone; and Christopher Stein. Bottom: Lisa Kennedy; Barbara McArdle; Roxanna Elder; Christopher Scharbach; and Sr. Dolores Crepeau, C.S.J.

New principals or those who are new to the Diocese of Brooklyn are required to participate in the St. Frances Cabrini Institute: a three-year program that culminates with a professional development certificate granted by Fordham University.

The purpose of the Cabrini Institute is to provide training, mentoring and professional services on a regular basis for new principals. This mandated program anticipates the needs of the novice administrator to implement the requirements of the Leadership Standards, to encourage student achievement and to improve and advance the educational program within the school/academy while strengthening Catholic Identity.

The St. Frances Cabrini Institute strives to enable principals to strongly exercise spiritual and academic leadership in the Catholic Elementary School/Academy reflecting the skills necessary for success in promoting the mission and vision of Catholic education within the Diocese of Brooklyn.

New Principals of Recently Formed Academies

 

James McKeon – St. Anselm Catholic Academy, Bay Ridge

Brother Lawrence Lavellee, F.M.S. – St. Brigid Catholic Academy,  Bushwick

Sister Kieran Nduagbo, D.D.L. – St. Jerome Catholic Academy, East Flatbush

Danielle Walden – Our Lady of Lourdes Catholic Academy, Queens Village

Roxanna Elder – Salve Regina Catholic Academy, East New York

 

New Principals at Parish Schools

 

Mary Bellone – Mary Queen of Heaven Catholic School, Mill Basin

Sister Dolores Crepeau, C.S.J. – Our Lady of Guadalupe Catholic School, Dyker Heights

Lisa Kennedy – St. Camillus Catholic School, Rockaway Beach

Christopher Scharbach – St. Francis de Sales Catholic School, Belle Harbor

Christopher Stein – St. Mel Catholic School, Flushing

Joseph Venticinque – St. Pancras Catholic School, Glendale

Joseph Carpenter – St. Thomas the Apostle Catholic School, Woodhaven

Diane Competello – St. Athanasius Catholic School, Bensonhurst

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Doctors Not Safe From Abortion

by Peter Finney Jr.

(CNS) –  Fine print contained in the Affordable Care Act has weakened conscience protections for physicians who oppose abortion, sterilization or other medical practices on religious or moral grounds, a doctor and ethicist told the American Academy of Fertility Care Professionals.

Dr. John Brehany, executive director and ethicist of the Catholic Medical Association, said with the passage of the new health care law, commonly called Obamacare, “the federal government is posing real threats to faithful health care professionals.”

­­“While Obamacare itself does have a couple of conscience-protection provisions built in, the fact is, if you look at the big picture, which are the old federal laws and what was achieved from 1973 to 2004, we are now missing some important protections, and we are now vague on how these old laws will carry forward into the future,” Brehany said Aug. 10 during the academy’s annual gathering in New Orleans.

One such old law is the Church amendment of 1973, for example, to shield individual and institutional health care providers from forced involvement in abortion or sterilization.

“While there are those old federal protections that go way back, Obamacare actually muddies the picture,” he said.

Brehany said in December, 2008, just before President George W. Bush left office, the Department of Health and Human Services wrote new regulations to implement existing federal laws “to give teeth and some guidance and enforcement provisions that had never been done before.” The regulations required compliance by professional medical societies, Brehany said.

“One of the first things the Obama administration said was ‘we’re rescinding that,’” Brehany said. “It took them two years to do it, and they just said they were modifying it. In between, they passed Obamacare in March, 2010, and they didn’t clarify what they were doing until February 2011.”

On Feb. 18, 2011, the Obama administration announced a partial rescission of the Bush administration’s regulation protecting the conscience rights of health care workers. HHS said parts of the 2008 regulation had “caused confusion and could be taken as overly broad.”

The 41-page final rule issued that day summarized and responded to the major themes of the more than 300,000 comments received by HHS during a lengthy public-comment period on its proposed rescission.

More than 97,000 individuals and organizations supported the move to rescind, with most saying the 2008 rule “unacceptably impacted patient rights and restricted access to health care and conflicted with federal law, state law and other guidelines addressing informed consent,” HHS said.

Nearly 187,000 comments opposed the proposal, expressing the conviction that “health care workers should not be required to perform procedures that violate their religious or moral convictions” or that rescission “would violate the First Amendment religious freedom rights of providers or the tenets or the Hippocratic Oath, and would impact the ethical integrity of the medical profession.”

“While the department carefully considered these comments, we do not specifically address them because this partial rescission does not alter or affect the existing federal health care provider conscience protections,” the HHS final rule said.

Under the previous rules, physicians had been protected from discrimination if they had moral or religious objections to participating in “several kinds of health care,” such as training in abortion procedures, performing abortions or surgical sterilizations or prescribing artificial contraceptives.

According to Brehany, the new HHS rules indicate there is full conscience protection only for medical professionals who “object to performing abortion – period. That’s it. It doesn’t say, facilitating, helping, paying for. It says performing abortions, period. This is a strategic attack on religious freedom.”

“The point is, if you look at trends in federal law and this administration, they are weakening or certainly muddying the waters of having clear and certain protections for rights of conscience,” Brehany said.

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Youth Views: Why do you volunteer for your youth group?

 

 

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James Chauca, 18
St. Teresa Parish
I enjoy coming to youth group meetings because I have a good time.

Joanna Morocho, 12 St. Gabriel Church The thing that motivates me to come to my youth group every Friday is the fun activities and the things we learn about God. What is right and what is wrong. It helps me to be a better person.

Joanna Morocho, 12
St. Gabriel Church
The thing that motivates me to come to my youth group every Friday is the fun activities and the things we learn about God. What is right and what is wrong. It helps me to be a better person.

Jahaira Valdez, 12 Most Precious Blood Church I come to listen to God. I feel like there is more to God than you think. I also get to know people who also love God.

Jahaira Valdez, 12
Most Precious Blood Church
I come to listen to God. I feel like there is more to God than you think. I also get to know people who also love God.

Erika Coello, 17 St. Teresa, Woodside I come to youth group every Friday because it helps me get through the troubles of life. They are a great second family.

Erika Coello, 17
St. Teresa, Woodside
I come to youth group every Friday because it helps me get through the troubles of life. They are a great second family.

 

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Pastoral Institute Announcing Registration For 10-week Foundations for Ministry Program

The Pastoral Institute has announced that registration for its 10-week Foundations for Ministry Program that begins in September is open. The program will be offered in English, Spanish, Mandarin and Polish at various host sites in the diocese. Designed for men and women who are discerning participation in the three-year Lay Ministry Program or who desire a basic update in theology for ministry, the program is also suitable for persons on their parish’s pastoral council.

The Foundations for Ministry Program affords an opportunity to grow spiritually and theologically.

Sessions in English will be held at St. Rose of Lima, Parkville, and St. Francis of Assisi, Astoria. Sessions in Spanish will be held at Regina Pacis, Bensonhurst, and Holy Child Jesus, Richmond Hill. The sessions in Mandarin will be at St. John Vianney, Flushing. St. Stanislaus Kostka, Greenpoint, will host the Polish classes.

An agency within the Secretariat for Catholic Education and Formation, the Pastoral Institute is committed to the formation of the baptized faithful for various lay leadership roles in the parishes. The Foundations for Ministry course is offered for $55 which includes all materials. Anyone interested should contact his or her pastor or the Pastoral Institute at 281-9556 or pastoralinstitute@diobrook.org.

 

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Brooklyn and Queens Youth build trenches to survive WYD Brazil.

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Pope appoints Brooklyn auxiliary bishop to head Diocese of Bridgeport

Cagg smilesWASHINGTON (CNS) — Pope Francis has appointed Auxiliary Bishop Frank J. Caggiano of Brooklyn, N.Y., as the fifth bishop of the Diocese of Bridgeport, Conn.

The appointment was announced July 31 in Washington by Archbishop Carlo Maria Vigano, apostolic nuncio to the United States.

Bishop Caggiano, 54, succeeds then-Bishop William E. Lori of Baltimore, who was named archbishop of Baltimore in March 2012.

Msgr. Jerald A. Doyle has been as administrator of the diocese since May 2012 and he will continue to serve in the post until Bishop Caggiano is installed.

No date has been announced for the installation.

“The Diocese of Bridgeport welcomes the news of Bishop Caggiano’s appointment. The Holy Father has blessed us with a priest, pastor and teacher with extensive experience at every level of diocesan ministries,” Msgr Doyle said in a statement.

“Most importantly, he is a man of deep faith, love for the church and commitment to the Gospel. On behalf of the clergy, religious and laity, we welcome him with open arms and with our prayers that God will bless him as the shepherd of our diocese,” the priest said.

Brooklyn Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio said that “first and foremost, Bishop Caggiano is an outstanding teacher, as is evidenced by the Holy See selecting him twice to offer catechesis to the young people at World Youth Days both in Madrid 2011 and just recently in Rio de Janeiro.”

“For 26 years, Bishop Caggiano has faithfully served the faithful of Brooklyn and Queens, and I can attest that he is an outstanding priest. He has been one of my closest collaborators,” he said.

“I can unequivocally state that he will be an outstanding pastor to the faithful of Bridgeport,” Bishop DiMarzio added.

Archbishop Lori, who headed the Bridgeport Diocese for 11 years, called Bishop Caggiano “a gifted teacher of the faith, whose evident love for the Lord Jesus Christ and his church will certainly further the work of the new evangelization in that diocese, which remains so close to my heart.”

“I offer my full support to Bishop Caggiano, and my prayers for him, just as I remember daily in my Masses and prayers the many good priests, religious and laity of the diocese I had the privilege of serving,” he added.

Ordained a priest in 1987 for the Diocese of Brooklyn, Bishop Caggiano has served in a number of pastoral and administrative positions. He has been both a pastor and also responsible for the formation of men for the permanent diaconate. In 2006, Bishop Caggiano was named an auxiliary bishop for Brooklyn and since then has served as vicar general and moderator of the curia.

In his statement, Bishop DiMarzio said that during his years serving the Brooklyn Diocese, Bishop Caggiano was “at the forefront” of reorganizing Catholic schools and academies “to make them sustainable for many years into the future.” Also, under his guidance, “all of our parishes were placed on firm financial footing to ensure their vibrancy for many years to come,” he added.

Bishop Caggiano was born in Brooklyn March 29, 1959. He holds a bachelor of arts degree in philosophy from Cathedral College in Queens; a master of divinity from Immaculate Conception Seminary, Huntington, N.Y.; and a licentiate and doctorate in theology from Rome’s Pontifical Gregorian University.

The Bridgeport Diocese covers a 633-square-mile area. Out of a total population of about 926,000, close to 411,000 people, or 44 percent, are Catholic.
Jesuit Father Jeffrey P. von Arx, president of Fairfield University, congratulated Bishop Caggiano on his appointment, welcoming him to the diocese.

He called it “a particularly auspicious announcement for our Jesuit university on this day — July 31st — the feast day of St. Ignatius, the founder of the Society of Jesus.”

He noted the bishop’s Jesuit education, as a graduate of Regis High School in New York and the Jesuit-founded Pontifical Gregorian University.

“He brings to our diocese a reputation for great warmth, love of the church, strength of leadership, and pastoral compassion,” Father von Arx said. “His experience as the auxiliary bishop in Brooklyn makes him ideally suited to lead our diverse and vibrant diocese.”

 

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Reporter’s Notebook – WYD Youth Sacrifice for the Lord – (with slide show)

By Antonina Zielinska

Tablet reporter Antonina Zielinska filed several dispatches from Rio de Janeiro. Here are her reports about spending a week with diocesan pilgrims to World Youth Day.

Reporter Antonina Zielinska, second from left, is seen with fellow World Youth Day pilgrims in Rio de Janeiro. Exclusive photos of the weeklong adventure can be found on thetablet.org and on Facebook.com/thetablet. The sites contain different photos in different formats. A Facebook account is not required to view photos.

Reporter Antonina Zielinska, second from left, is seen with fellow World Youth Day pilgrims in Rio de Janeiro. Exclusive photos of the weeklong adventure can be found on thetablet.org and on facebook.com/thetablet. The sites contain different photos in different formats. A Facebook account is not required to view photos.

 

RIO DE JANEIRO – After a day of sightseeing and walking over two hours to the Copacabana beach for the official opening Mass of World Youth Day 2013, pilgrims from the Brooklyn Diocese woke at the crack of dawn to attend their first catechesis, or teaching session.

“It’s amazing what you are willing to do for the Lord,” said Bishop Anthony Fisher, O.P., from Australia, who led the catechetical teachings at Immaculate Conception Church. “But it’s nothing compared to what He is willing to do for you…It’s wonderful to see that you will stand rain and hail to be with God.”

Pilgrim Daniel Estrada, 24, from Our Lady of Sorrows, Corona, said he was inspired by the bishop’s words and the lessons, which helped him get through his drowsiness.

“It was a bit exhausting, though oddly enough I feel rejuvenated,” he said. “I woke up with great spirit. Seeing the community together here lifted my spirit.”

Another way the catechesis raised the pilgrims’ spirits was by engaging everyone in song and dance.

“It was awkward at first, but it grew on me,” said pilgrim George Prezioso, 17, from St. Patrick’s parish, Bay Ridge.

He said the sessions lived up to the many stories he heard about World Youth Day Madrid in 2011.

“I think it’s good to be with youth from around the world,” he said.

Pilgrim Justin Rosales, 16, from St. Athanasius parish, Bensonhurst, met people from other English-speaking countries and in the process learned that he had a Brooklyn accent.

Estrada said he also gained a new perspective on the negatives that can come out of the many comforts young people have.

“Faith is not cookie cutter,” he said. “I never thought of the downside of having so much.”

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Reporter’s Notebook – WYD – Overnight Vigil (with slide show)

DiM on the beach

Bishop DiMarzio stands in solidarity with his pilgrims who have overcome many obstacles and last-minute changes to be able to observe an overnight vigil on Copacabana beach. The pilgrims would soon begin to build trenches to protect themselves from the elements.

by Antonina Zielinska

The more than 200 pilgrims from Brooklyn and Queens walked over six miles with provisions and sleeping bags, alongside pilgrims from all around the world, for the overnight vigil on Copacabana beach.

The site was moved to the beach because the original vigil site was flooded. Diocesan leaders were receiving conflicting reports of whether the pilgrims would be allowed to remain on the beach through the night or if they would have to return to their hotels and walk to Copacabana once again in the morning.

Benedict Joson, 22, from St. Sebastian parish, said he did not know what to expect from the walk. Once he started, he said it was difficult, but the sites were beautiful and the atmosphere uplifting.

“There was a lot of affirmation especially from the locals who met us along the way and the pilgrims from around the world,” he said.

The youngsters walked on a closed highway following the diocesan flag so as not to get lost among the other three million people. In order to keep their energy up, the pilgrims cheered and sang along the way. When they began to show signs of drowsiness, locals or other pilgrims chanted “USA!” to lift their spirits.

Once they reached their destination, they found it tightly packed with pilgrims speaking in many different languages. After carefully stepping around sleeping bags, they eventually found a spot by a TV Jumbotron.

However, the spot was close to the water, and the tide was coming in, bringing the water dangerously close to their belongings.

The youth jumped into action after deciding that their best hopes of staying dry for the night was to build sand trenches to block the water.

“It’s literally been punches left and right,” said pilgrim Diana Arrega, 19, from St. Joseph Co-Cathedral, who spent two hours helping build the trench. “You expect one thing, and the circumstances are completely different…It’s up to us to overcome it. I actually enjoyed the entire experience, not knowing what’s going to happen next because it’s an excitement life brings you.”

She said that although the building was exhausting, it brought the pilgrims closer together. One experience that Arrega said she came to appreciate was standing for hours to see the pope and missing him, twice. The first time, she waited for five hours and only got a glimpse of his head. The second time, she waited two hours and did not see him at all.

For the vigil, the pope arrived by popemobile. This time, Arrega waited only 20 minutes and was able to catch him smiling.

“I actually think I prefer this one to Madrid (World Youth Day 2011) because after all the struggles, this moment was worth it,” she said.

Karen Quiroz-Muñoz, 19, also from St. Joseph Co-Cathedral, experienced similar hardships trying to catch a glimpse of the pope. During the vigil, she saw signs that the popemobile was coming, but this time she did not wait for the pontiff with the others because she was discouraged by her past experience. Instead, she went souvenir shopping and ended up being on the pope’s path. This time, she not only saw the pontiff, she experienced a very Pope Francis moment.

“I think that since I didn’t try to record, I enjoyed the moment 10 times more,” she said. “Then, a couple of feet in front of us, the popemobile stopped, and the pope started kissing everyone’s flags. It was phenomenal.”

Quiroz-Muñoz said the experience has been invaluable.

“I learned to stop planning and just go with it,” she said. “The most unexpected things bring you the most happiness.”

“What I appreciated the most of the overnight at Copacabana was the energy that was generated, seeing the dancing/praying combination with the devotion and contemplation,” Joson said. “I observed a lot of people in tune with their faith and God, and I could see they were very emotional.”

In the evening, Pope Francis led the youth in Eucharistic adoration. He knelt before the Blessed Sacrament, and three million pilgrims knelt behind him. The beach fell silent with the exception of the waves breaking along the Atlantic coastline.

After the excitement of seeing Pope Francis and a generally exhausting week, pilgrims from the diocese fell asleep surrounded by their fellow pilgrims from around the world.

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Reporter’s Notebook – WYD – Brooklyn Bishops Support Their Pilgrims

Bishop DiMarzio checks on how his pilgrims are holding up halfway through their week in Brazil. The pilgrims enjoyed Brazilian specialties of various grilled meats. The pilgrims had to guess as to what they were eating, because the Portuguese speaking servers did not have time to explain. They had to feed 200 hungry teenagers, many of whom had not had a proper dinner since their arrival.

Bishop DiMarzio checks on how his pilgrims are holding up halfway through their week in Brazil. The pilgrims enjoyed Brazilian specialties of various grilled meats. The pilgrims had to guess as to what they were eating, because the Portuguese speaking servers did not have time to explain. They had to feed 200 hungry teenagers, many of whom had not had a proper dinner since their arrival.

by Antonina Zielinska

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio and Auxiliary Bishops Frank Caggiano and Octavio Cisneros all went to a show with the 224 Brooklyn delegates in Rio de Janeiro for World Youth Day.

Afterwards, Bishop DiMarzio took everyone out to a local steakhouse for dinner.

The show was a praise and worship concert accompanied by testimony about vocations. There were all sorts of Catholic musicians and speakers to inspire the youth to discern what God’s vocation for them. The pilgrims from Brooklyn and Queens, who made up the largest contingent from the U.S., danced and clapped along to messages of service to God.

At the end of the performances, a monstrance blessed by Pope John Paul II displayed the Living God for the audience to participate in a Eucharistic adoration. For 15 minutes during the service, the once buzzing room fell silent in reflection before the Blessed Sacrament.

“It made prayer what it should be,” said 20-year-old pilgrim Charles Maniego from Holy Family parish, Flushing. “It’s talking to God. I got so deep into it, that when I stood up, I felt chills…I forgot that there was people around me.”

“I really liked the last 15 minutes,” said pilgrim Jessica Uruchima, 19, from St. Sebastian parish, Woodside. “It was just me and God.”

After spending time in silence with God, the pilgrims broke bread with their bishops at an all-you-can-eat Brazilian steakhouse.

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio and Auxiliary Bishops Frank Caggiano and Octavio Cisneros huddle together with diocesan pilgrims after sharing a feast in Rio de Janeiro.

Bishop Nicholas DiMarzio and Auxiliary Bishops Frank Caggiano and Octavio Cisneros huddle together with diocesan pilgrims after sharing a feast in Rio de Janeiro.

“The support of the bishops is important,” said 23-year-old pilgrim Jessica Ortega from St. Sebastian’s parish. “It made us realize that we are not only representing the Church, but we are representing the diocese.”

“It was fun,” Uruchima said. “It was nice for everyone to be together… We moved around, we didn’t just stick to our parish. It’s nice because we really got to know each other, and we were not isolated.”

“I thought it brought everybody together, especially the youth, because they got to know each other on a more personal level,” said Tosha M. Eapen, a chaperone from St. Sebastian’s parish. “The priests were so available. They listened. They were very friendly.”

“We were with a bunch of priests,” Maniego said. “And I never really talked to them before. They were so unintimidating. They were joking around. It made me realize they are people, too.”

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